September...

Which is it?  I thought I’d look that up!

Before it was autumn and fall, it was harvest. While the modern names of winter and summer have been around for more than 1,000 years, the names of fall and spring are more recent—and less constant. This is partly because the two seasons were long viewed as secondary to summer and winter. As late as the 18th century, English speakers were less likely to think of the year as having four seasons, focusing instead on the coldest and warmest portions of the year. Even when they spoke of fall, they couldn’t agree when, exactly, it took place. In the 17th and 18th centuries, dictionaries by both Thomas Blount and Samuel Johnson noted that some thought that fall began in August and ended in November, while others contested that it began in September (at the equinox) and ended in December (with the solstice).

Both spring and autumn used to go by different names. In the 12th and 13th centuries, spring was called lent or lenten, while fall was called harvest. In the 14th century things got a little chaotic. Lenten disappeared around the beginning of the 1300s, and the later lent similarly vanished only a few decades later. (It survives, of course, as the name for a religious observance.) By the end of the 14th century there was no firm word for springtime. People referred to it as part of summer. Harvest as a word to mean not just “a time of reaping” but also, even for city folk, “the third season of the year” lasted longer. But it was joined by autumn—a word borrowed from the French—by the 16th century.

Spring and fall likely gained popularity in conjunction with each other. They each initially appeared in the 16th century as spring of the leaf and fall of the leaf, respectively. The two complemented each other nicely and were soon shortened to the more succinct fall and spring, with the longer phrases disappearing over the next few hundred years.

The rise of autumn and the appearance of fall happened around the same time as the British arrival on the American continent, and it’s there that the latter really caught on. In fact one of the Oxford English Dictionary’s first citations of fall comes from Sir Walter Raleigh, one of the first English explorers of North America: In his poem “The Nymph’s reply to the Shepherd”  he uses the word to contrast with spring. Fall hasn’t ever had quite as much currency in the United Kingdom as it has stateside—even though some Brits concede that North Americans have the superior term. In The King’s English, the Fowler brothers counseled against Americanisms, but expessed envy over fall:  

Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short, Saxon (like the other three season names), picturesque; it reveals its derivation to every one who uses it, not to the scholar only, like autumn.

Who doesn’t love this time of year….

 

Sedona

Canyon de Chelly

Sedona

Aravaipa Canyon

Watson Lake


We live in a beautiful state!  So what a great time to celebrate with a Fall Tea.  These are some of the most fabulous flavors ever. 

And hey… does it ALWAYS have to be a TEA????   How about a lovely Fall breakfast?  Years ago I stayed at a Bed and Breakfast in the White Mountains and had my first ‘Dutch Baby’.  I’m an adventuresome eater, so will try lots of things.  Even an egg dish that is topped with – powdered sugar and lemons!!!   I ended up having it every day that I was there.  Give it a try – it is super easy if you have a cast iron skillet.

Dutch Baby

Ingredients 

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 pinch ground nutmeg
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons confectioners' sugar for dusting

 Directions

·       Prep  8 min   Cook 12 min    Ready In 20 min

 

1.    Place a 10 inch cast iron skillet inside oven and preheat oven to 475 degrees F

2.  In a medium bowl, beat eggs with a whisk until light. Add milk and stir. Gradually whisk in flour, nutmeg and salt [blended together in a separate bowl first]

3.  Remove skillet from oven and reduce oven heat to 425 degrees F Melt butter in hot skillet so that inside of skillet is completely coated with butter. Pour all the batter in the skillet and return skillet to oven.

4.  Bake until puffed and lightly browned, about 12 minutes. Remove promptly and sprinkle with powdered sugar.  And it is super yummy to squeeze on some fresh lemon!  Delish!!!!!!!!

 


And of course since… well… it’s ME doing brunch – I have to do cool brunch cocktails.  I thought I’d check with the one place I know I could find some different drinks – Thanks Martha!  I love what she has written on this site:

Day drinking is always a good idea! Encourage guests to linger a little longer over brunch with these easy-to-make (and drink!) cocktails.

 

Hey – I’m all about day drinking !!

Pineapple-Raspberry Bellini

Ingredients

 

  • 2 cups raspberries, plus more for serving
  • 2 cups pineapple juice
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 bottle (750 milliliters) chilled brut sparkling white wine
  • 1 cup chilled seltzer

Directions

Blend raspberries, pineapple juice, and vanilla until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve, pressing on solids; pour into a pitcher. Top with wine. Let foam settle; top with seltzer and stir gently to combine. Put a few raspberries in each glass, pour, and serve.

 

 

Morning Margarita

Two guest-star ingredients turn a typical happy-hour margarita into a sunny brunch beverage: Orange marmalade adds a bittersweet tang, and El Guitarron agave wine comes from the same plant as tequila but has about half the alcohol, so you can toast over French toast without needing a siesta.

Ingredients

1 ounce fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for rim and garnish

  • Kosher salt
  • 2 ounces El Guitarron agave wine
  • 1/2 ounce Cointreau
  • 2 teaspoons orange marmalade
  • 1 teaspoon superfine sugar
  • Orange wedges, for garnish

 

  • Directions
  • Moisten the edge of a glass with lime wedge, then dip it in salt. Fill a cocktail shaker halfway with ice. Add agave wine, Cointreau, lime juice, marmalade, and sugar; shake 30 seconds. Fill glass with ice, strain drink over top, and garnish with orange and lime wedges.

Semifreddo Bellini

Semifreddo means "half cold" in Italian. Here it refers to the slushy mixture that brings texture and flavor to this classic Champagne cocktail

Ingredients

 

  • 1 cup peeled, chopped peaches, frozen until hardened
  • 1/4 cup peach schnapps
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons chilled Champagne or sparkling white wine
  • 2 tablespoons superfine sugar
  • 1 cup small ice cubes
  • Peach slices, for garnish

 Directions

Blend peaches, peach schnapps, 2 tablespoons Champagne, the sugar, and ice in a blender until smooth. Divide mixture between 2 glasses; top off each glass with 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons Champagne, and serve.

 

And on to other yummy Fall recipes…

 

 Pumpkin French Toast Bake

 

Sweet and spicy pumpkin french toast is made the night before for an easy, early-morning preparation.

 

·       Serves: 10

·       Ingredients

  • 5 1/2 - 7 1/2 cups 1-inch bread cubes (depending on type of bread)*
  • 7 large eggs
  • 2 cups milk 
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 cup (87 g) pumpkin butter (or 1/2 cup pumpkin puree)*
  • 3-4 Tbsp brown sugar for topping
  • optional: Nuts, like pecan or walnuts

 

Instructions

1.    Cut any kind of bread into 1-inch cubes - Just use enough slice to fill a lightly greased 9x13-inch baking dish quite full.

2.  In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, vanilla, pumpkin butter and pie spice until well combined. Pour over bread and push down with a spoon or your hands until it's all soaked and mostly covered. Cover with saran wrap or lid and refrigerate overnight.

3.  In the morning, preheat oven to 350 degrees F, uncover and top with brown sugar, additional pumpkin pie spice and nuts (optional). Bake for 35-45 minutes or golden brown and no longer wet.

4.  Serve immediately with maple syrup, honey or agave nectar. Store leftovers in the refrigerator covered for up to a couple days.

 

Notes

*For the bread cubes, just use as much bread as it takes to fill the bottom of your dish generously, plus up about 1 to 1.5 inches. If you've added too much to soak up the liquid, just remove some. And if it looks too wet, add some more bread.

*I HIGHLY recommend using pumpkin butter, as it has a concentrated pumpkin flavor and is much sweeter than puree. But if using puree instead of butter, it's important to compensate the flavor by adding a bit more puree, pumpkin pie spice, and a little agave nectar, brown sugar or maple syrup to the batter. Otherwise, it will lack that delicious fall, pumpkin flavor you're going for.


Apple Cinnamon Pancakes

 

 

Fluffy cinnamon pancakes with ooey gooey apple topping! The perfect Autumn breakfast.

 Serves: 4

Ingredients:

 

pancakes

  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1½ tablespoons vinegar
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon (if you really love cinnamon you can add another ½ teaspoon)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons oil

apple topping

  • 2 tablespoon butter
  • 2 apples, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • cup maple syrup
  •  

Instructions

1.    Preheat a skillet to medium-high heat (275 degrees).

2.  Whisk together the milk and vinegar and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

3.  While milk is curdling, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl.

4.  Whisk egg and oil into milk. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir until combined (don't over-mix, it should still have some lumps).

5.  Spray skillet with cooking spray. Use a ¼ cup measuring cup to pour batter onto skillet. Cook about 2 minutes until bubbles form and the edges start to look "dry". Use a spatula to flip the pancake and cook another 1-2 minutes on the other side. Set pancakes aside and repeat with remaining batter.

6.  Add butter, apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon to a medium sauce pan. Stir over medium heat 3-5 minutes until apples are very tender. Stir in syrup. Serve apple topping over warm pancakes.

 

 

Apple & Bacon Butternut Squash Hash

Ingredients:

About 2 cups peeled and diced butternut squash (fresh not frozen)
1 cup diced tart apples (about 1 large apple)4-5 strips Bacon
1/4 cup or more chopped green onions
1/2 tsp coarse ground salt (or to taste)
fresh cracked pepper to taste

Add a handful of pecans at the end too.

 

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to broil (you can skip the broiling and cook everything in the pan too, but pre cook the butternut squash first)

2. After prepping the ingredients, heat a large skillet over a medium heat.

3. While the skillet is heating up, spread the diced butternut squash out evenly onto a parchment paper lined cookie sheet. Place under the broiler. Boil the butternut squash till it just starts to brown in spots and develop a skin, takes about 10-15 minutes. Stir once halfway through cooking. Watch that it doesn’t burn to much though. Remove from the oven.

4. While the butternut squash is baking, add the bacon to the preheated skillet. Cook till crispy, then set aside to drain and cool, then break into pieces. Leave the bacon fat in the skillet for frying the squash.

5. Add all the butternut squash and apples to the bacon fat (if it has cooled down too much reheat before adding these ingredients) Continue to cook and stir the hash over medium-medium high heat until the apples just begin to soften. It helps to spread the hash evenly around the pan, then let it sit for a moment before continuing to flip/stir it around again. This will help it to ‘brown’ instead of steam itself, which could result in a soggy hash.

6. Remove from the heat, add the bacon pieces, scallions, coarse salt and cracked pepper to taste (and pecans). Toss to combine.

 

This would be really yummy with some of those apple sausages you can get at Trader Joes.

 

Sweet Potato Breakfast Skillet with Bacon

 

Serves: 4 generous servings

 

Ingredients:

 

12 ounces of bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces

 

Additional bacon fat, lard, ghee, or coconut oil

5 cups diced sweet potatoes (about a 1/2 inch dice)

4 cups diced zucchini

1 cup chopped onion

1 red bell pepper, chopped

6 large eggs

Black pepper to taste

 

Instructions

 

In a 12-inch cast iron skillet cook the bacon pieces over medium-low heat until crisp (cooking the bacon at a lower temperature will render more fat).

Use a slotted spoon to remove the cooked bacon from the pan. Set aside. There should be enough rendered bacon fat to coat the entire bottom of the skillet, about 1/8 inch deep. If your bacon didn’t render this much fat (it can vary from brand to brand), add additional bacon fat, lard, ghee, or coconut oil to your skillet until there is 1/8 inch of fat.

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees (F).

Increase heat to medium-high and carefully place the diced sweet potatoes in the hot oil. Cook the sweet potatoes without stirring until the bottom of the cubes start to turn golden brown (this can take several minutes). Stir and cook until the cubes just start to soften.

Increase heat to high and add the zucchini, onion, and bell pepper to the skillet. Cook until the vegetables are just starting to soften.

Stir in bacon pieces. Remove from heat.

Make 6 wells in the potato and veggie mixture; break one egg into each well.

Place skillet in the oven and bake for 9-14 minutes, or until the eggs are set. Serve immediately.

 

Savory Pear Dutch Baby with smoked gouda and leeks (serves 4-5 as a main dish, 6-8 as a side)

  • 8 tablespoons butter (preferably unsalted, but salted also works), divided
  • 1 medium leek, washed and sliced thinly (just the white and very beginning of the light green portion)
  • 2 medium pears, ripe but still firm, peeled, cored, and sliced into 1/4 inch slices
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 1/4 cup milk (whole milk – it’s the holidays, don’t skimp!)
  • 1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 3/4 cups grated smoked gouda cheese
  • 1-2 tablespoon chopped fresh chives, to garnish (optional)

 

1.    Preheat your oven to 425F. In a large sautee pan, melt 2 Tbs. of the butter over medium and cook for about 3 minutes, until it starts taking on a little nutty smell. Add in the leeks, stir and cook for 2-3 minutes until they begin to soften. Then, stir in the pears and cook for another 3 or so minutes until they are browned and softened as well. Remove from the heat..

2.  Put the eggs, milk, flour, salt and pepper into a blender and whirr them at high speed for about a minute, until they are well combined.

3.  Plop the remaining 6 Tbs. butter into a 12-inch cast iron skillet

and put the pan into the oven. Wait until the butter is completely melted and sizzling, then (carefully!) take the pan out and swirl the butter around to make sure the pan is coated.

4.  Spread the leek and pears on the bottom of the cast iron. Pour the egg mixture on top. Finally, sprinkle the cheese all over it and put it back into the oven for 20 minutes, until browned on top. The pancake will puff up as it bakes

5.  When finished, take the Dutch baby out of the oven and scatter the chives (or another fresh herb of your choice – like thyme or sage) across the top. Serve warm.

 

But we can’t leave out the TEA basics…

 

Butternut Squash Tartlets

Yield: 8

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 7.48.44 AM

 

Ingredients

1.    1 tablespoon salted butter

2.  ½ cup sliced leeks (white part only)

3.  1 (14.1-ounce) package refrigerated pie dough (2 sheets)

4.  4 cups diced peeled butternut squash

5.  1 tablespoon olive oil

6.  ¼ teaspoon salt

7.  ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper

8.  3 tablespoons salted butter, melted

9.  1 tablespoon light brown sugar

10.                 ½ teaspoon ground sage

11.       2 tablespoons finely crumbled cooked bacon

12.                 Garnish: fresh sage leaves

 

Instructions

1.    In a small sauté pan, melt 1 tablespoon butter over medium-high heat. Add leeks, and reduce heat to low. Cook, stirring frequently, until leeks are caramelized and lightly golden at edges, approximately 15 minutes. Let cool before finely chopping.

2.  Preheat oven to 450°.

3.  On a lightly floured surface, unroll pie dough. Using a 4½ x 2½-inch tartlet pan as a guide, cut 8 rectangles from pie dough. Press into bottom and up sides of 8 (4½ x 2½- inch) tartlet pans. Place pans on a rimmed baking sheet, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

4.  Prick bottoms of tartlet shells with a fork to prevent puffing during baking.

5.  Bake until very lightly browned, approximately 7 minutes. Let cool completely on wire racks.

6.  Reduce oven temperature to 400°.

7.  Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil.

8.  In a medium bowl, toss squash with olive oil, salt, and pepper to coat. Place in an even layer on prepared baking sheet.

9.  Bake until tender, approximately 20 minutes, stirring halfway through.

10.                 Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine 3 tablespoons melted butter, brown sugar, and ground sage, stirring to blend. Add squash, tossing gently to coat with butter mixture. Add caramelized leeks and bacon, stirring to blend. Divide mixture among cooled tartlet shells.

11.Garnish each tartlet with a fresh sage leaf, if desired.

 

Notes

1.    Make-Ahead Tip: Squash mixture can be made a day in advance, covered, and refrigerated. Gently rewarm before using, adding more butter, if needed. Tartlet shells can be made earlier in the day, and stored in an airtight container at room temperature.

 

 

Cinnamon Scones

Yield: 12

cinnamon

 

Ingredients

1.    2 cups all-purpose flour

2.  cup sugar

3.  2 teaspoons baking powder

4.  ½ teaspoon salt

5.  4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 3.50.22 PM

6.  ¾ cup cinnamon morsels*

7.  ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons cold heavy 
whipping cream

8.  ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

9.  Garnish: turbinado sugar

 

Instructions

1.    Preheat oven to 350°.

2.  Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

3.  In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add cinnamon morsels, stirring to blend.

4.  In a liquid-measuring cup, combine cream and vanilla extract, stirring to blend. Add to flour mixture, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more cream,
 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms.

5.  Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to
5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ½-inch thickness. Using
a 3¼-inch triangular-shaped cutter, cut 12 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones
2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet.

6.  Garnish scones with a sprinkle of turbinado sugar, if desired.

7.  Bake until edges of scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 20 minutes.

8.  Serve warm.

 

 

ginger

Double-Ginger Scones

Yield: 12

 

Ingredients

1.    2 cups all-purpose flour

2.  cup organic cane sugar

3.  2 teaspoons baking powder

4.  1 teaspoon ground ginger

5.  ½ teaspoon salt

6.  4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces

7.  3 tablespoons chopped crystalized ginger

8.  ¾ cup unsweetened almond milk

9.  1 egg yolk

10.                 Garnish: sliced almonds, additional crystalized ginger

 

Instructions

1.    Preheat oven to 350°.

2.  Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

3.  In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, ground ginger, and salt, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add crystalized ginger, stirring to blend.

4.  In a small bowl, combine almond milk and egg yolk, whisking well. Add to flour mixture, stirring until mixture is evenly moist. (If dough seems dry, add more almond milk, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms.

5.  Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ¾-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch fluted square cutter, cut 12 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet.

6.  Garnish tops of scones with sliced almonds and crystalized ginger, if desired.

7.  Bake until edges of scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, approximately 20 minutes.

8.  Serve warm.

 

 

Gluten-free Fig and Blue Cheese Scones

Yield: 24 to 26 scones

fig

 

Ingredients

3 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour*

1.    4½ teaspoons baking powder

2.  ½ teaspoon salt

3.  ½ cup cold butter

4.  1 cup chopped dried figs

5.  ½ cup blue cheese crumbles

6.  1¾ cups cold heavy whipping cream

7.  1 large egg

8.  2 tablespoons turbinado sugar

 

Instructions

1.    Preheat oven to 400°.

2.  Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Set aside.

3.  In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt, whisking to combine. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until mixture is crumbly. Add figs and blue cheese, stirring to combine. Set aside.

4.  In a small bowl, combine cream and egg, whisking well. Add to flour mixture, stirring until a dough forms. (If mixture seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until uniformly moist.)

5.  Using a levered 3-tablespoon scoop, drop dough onto prepared baking sheets. Sprinkle tops of scones with turbinado sugar.

6.  Bake until light golden brown, 13 to 15 minutes.

7.  Serve warm.

 

 

 

chai

Chai Scones

Yield: 12 scones •

 

Ingredients

1.    2 cups all-purpose flour

2.  cup firmly packed light brown sugar

3.  2 teaspoons baking powder

4.  2 teaspoons ground ginger

5.  1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

6.  ½ teaspoon salt

7.  ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom

8.  ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper

9.  ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves

10.                 4 tablespoons cold salted butter, cut into pieces

11.1 cup cold heavy whipping cream, divided

12.                 ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

 

Instructions

1.    Preheat oven to 350°.

2.  Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.

3.  In a large bowl, combine flour, brown sugar, baking powder, ginger, cinnamon, salt, cardamom, pepper, and cloves, whisking well. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into flour mixture until flour mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

4.  Reserve 1 tablespoon cream for brushing scones. In a small bowl, combine remaining cream and vanilla extract, stirring to blend. Add cream mixture to flour mixture, stirring until mixture comes together. (If dough seems dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, until dough is uniformly moist.) Working gently, bring mixture together with hands until a dough forms.

5.  Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead gently 4 to 5 times. Using a rolling pin, roll dough to a ¾-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch square cutter, cut 12 scones from dough. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. Brush tops of scones with reserved 1 tablespoon cream.

6.  Bake until edges of scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in the centers comes out clean, 18 to 20 minutes.

Recommended Condiments

1.    • Clotted Cream

2.  • Orange Marmalade

 

 

Earl Gray tea cakes

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 8.03.53 AM

 

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 5 Earl Grey tea bags
  • 7 ounces unsalted butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest, finely grated
  • 1 1/3 baking powder
  • Earl Grey glaze:
  • 1 1/2 cups icing sugar
  • 3/4 ounces butter
  • 3-4 tablespoons Earl Grey tea (strongly steeped)
  • 1-2 drops of purple food coloring (for a lilac color)

 

Instructions

1.    Place the milk in a microwave-safe bowl, and heat it for 90 seconds or until it is hot but not boiling. Add the tea bags and stir briefly. Cover with a piece of foil.

2.  Infuse the hot milk for 12-15 minutes, until the milk is a caramel color and very fragrant.

3.  Pour the milk through a wire strainer into a measuring cup, to remove the tea bags. Squeeze the bags over the milk to extract all of the flavor. You should have 1 cup of milk. Cool until the milk is room temperature.

4.  Preheat the oven to 325 F. Grease an 8-inch cake tin and line it with baking paper.

5.  Use an electric mixer to beat the butter, sugar and vanilla in a medium bowl until pale and creamy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Using a spatula, fold in the flour, lemon zest, baking powder and milk until combined.

6.  Spoon mixture into prepared tin and smooth the surface with the back of a spoon. Bake for 1 hour until a skewer comes out clean. Leave the cake in the tin for 5 minutes before turning it out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

7.  For the glaze, place all the ingredients in a heat-proof bowl and melt over a double boiler until the icing is melted, glossy, and smooth.

8.  Cut the cake into even squares and cover entirely with the glaze. Let dry on a wire rack positioned over a baking sheet to catch the drips. Decorate with edible flowers.


Ok everybody… crank up the ovens… call your friends… Day drink!!!

Have an awesome Fall






                                                                     © Michelle Young 2012